Visit Ross

There's plenty to do in Ross, here are some ideas

Itineraries

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The Four Corners of Ross have held this title for many years. It relates to the uses of the buildings located at this intersection, namely the Catholic Church (Salvation) the Man O’ Ross Hotel (Temptation), the Town Hall (Recreation) and the Town Gaol, remodelled in 1921 as a house. (Damnation).

A further play on these words can be used for your visit to Ross. Temptation can lead you into the many shops, cafes, bakeries and pub. Recreation can see you enjoying the entertainment and events that happen such as the marathon held every year on Father’s Day,  attending car and motor bike rallies, the Ross Rodeo,  fishing, swimming and  the monthly film night to name a few. Damnation could relate to the harsh penal system that was operating when Ross was established. For family history buffs, Ross may provide links with ancestors who were stationed here during their incarceration. The beauty of the village is also a tribute to the hard labours of these convicts, particularly the Ross Bridge and its decorative carvings. Salvation is preached from the three prominent churches in the village. Salvation to people today could be translated as - redemption, deliverance, rescue, recovery and escape.  These words could equally relate to a well-earned break in the tranquil village of Ross!

Half an hour in Ross

Short detour

Having a break from the highway with just bit of little time to spare?

All your needs can be met and are available in Church Street, the main street of Ross - refreshments,  public toilets, Post Office (which also offers some banking services), fuel and tourist information are within easy reach.

Morning visit (four hours)

A morning in Ross

When you arrive in Ross, call into the Tasmanian Wool Centre which is the Visitor Information Centre for the village. While there see the interesting museums that focus on the history of the village and the story of the wool industry in the area. Collect a Ross Information Guide Book and Female Factory Guide map and head down to the beautiful sandstone convict carved Ross Bridge to view the amazing 186 carvings around its 6 arches. Follow the path around the riverbank to the Female Factory site. The cottage on site is open daily (free admission) and presents graphic wall panels within its rooms, recounting the story of the Female Factory and other occupants who once lived here.

By now you must be ready for a bite to eat so stroll back along the path until you reach the stone steps that lead you up the hill and back to Church Street.  Cross over the four corners of Ross and from this point you have a choice of eateries to sate your hunger. For lunch you could choose a takeaway from one of the nearby eateries to consume down by the river or at a picnic table under the Elm trees in Church Street. If the weather is inclement, all establishments offer a dine-in option. If you wanted to partake of a local wine or ale with your meal, the Man O’ Ross Hotel is open for lunch and dinner daily.

Ross is a beautiful village to stroll around after a satisfying meal. Church Street is a great place to ‘promenade’.  With your guide book in hand you can follow the story of the heritage buildings you pass along the way. There are also a variety of interesting shops to visit where you can find that illusive gift that you must take home. There are many gift shops, antique and second hand treasure shops, an art gallery and Tasmanian timber and craft shop as well as the Tasmanian Wool Centre.  

Alternatively, if scenery is your interest, you could walk to the top of Park Street for a panoramic view of the village and surrounding countryside. This is also the location of the earliest burial ground. Many of the headstones date from the 1830’s and ‘40’s and have been attributed to Daniel Herbert who is accredited as the artist and sculptor of the Ross Bridge. Herbert’s grave is also here, marked by a table top gravestone he carved for his son who died as an infant. When Herbert died, he was subsequently buried in the same grave. From the hill you can also see the working face of one of the quarries that supplied the beautiful sandstone which is visible on so many buildings in the village.

Afternoon visit (four hours)

Spend an afternoon with us

When you arrive in Ross, call into the Tasmanian Wool Centre which is the Visitor Information Centre for the village. While there see the interesting museums that focus on the history of the village and the story of the wool industry in the area. Collect a Ross Information Guide Book and Female Factory Guide map and head down to the beautiful sandstone convict carved Ross Bridge to view the amazing 186 carvings around its 6 arches. Follow the path around the riverbank to the Female Factory site. The cottage on site is open daily (free admission) and presents graphic wall panels within its rooms, recounting the story of the Female Factory and other occupants who once lived here.

By now you must be ready for a bite to eat so stroll back along the path until you reach the stone steps that lead you up the hill and back to Church Street.  Cross over the four corners of Ross and from this point you have a choice of eateries to sate your hunger. For a late lunch you could choose a takeaway from one of the nearby eateries to consume down by the river or at a picnic table under the Elm trees in Church Street. If the weather is inclement, all establishments offer a dine-in option. If you wanted to partake of a local wine or ale with your meal, the Man O’ Ross Hotel is open for lunch and dinner daily.

Ross is a beautiful village to stroll around after a satisfying meal. Church Street is a great place to ‘promenade’.  With your guide book in hand you can follow the story of the heritage buildings you pass along the way. There are also a variety of interesting shops to visit where you can find that illusive gift that you must take home. There are many gift shops, antique and second hand treasure shops, an art gallery and Tasmanian timber and craft shop as well as the Tasmanian Wool Centre.  

Alternatively, if scenery is your interest, you could walk to the top of Park Street for a panoramic view of the village and surrounding countryside. This is also the location of the earliest burial ground. Many of the headstones date from the 1830’s and ‘40’s and have been attributed to Daniel Herbert who is accredited as the artist and sculptor of the Ross Bridge. Herbert’s grave is also here, marked by a table top gravestone he carved for his son who died as an infant. When Herbert died, he was subsequently buried in the same grave. From the hill you can also see the working face of one of the quarries that supplied the beautiful sandstone which is visible on so many buildings in the village.

Evening meals are available at the Man O' Ross Hotel and in the warmer months also at the Ross Bakery Inn where pizzas are on the menu to dine in or take-away.

One or two days

Full immersion in the history of Ross

For visitors who are stay in Ross overnight or longer there are plenty of options to consider.

Follow the suggested morning itinerary to acquaint yourself with the main points of interest and then slow the speed down to explore the village at an easier pace.

The riverbanks near the Ross Bridge make a wonderful place for a picnic. If the weather is warm enough you could even have a swim in the Macquarie River or if fishing is your interest you could drop a line in for a chance at a free feed!

During summer there is a wonderful community pool for children and adults to enjoy. Entry fees apply.

Ross is a magical place after dark. Most of the day visitors have left and the streets are free of cars. There is a sense of peace in the village as the vintage street lights shed a warm amber glow of filtered dappled light through the Elm trees and onto the quiet streets below. It’s a perfect time for a stroll to see the floodlit features of the village which includes the Uniting Church, The War Memorial and the Ross Bridge.

Ross is also perfect for star gazers. The absence of city lights makes it much easier to see the stars and constellations.  The Aurora Australis (the Southern Borealis) is a regular feature on a clear night from the higher hills of Ross.

If your visit coincides with the monthly film night (2nd Friday of the month) casual memberships are available. A wide variety of latest releases and classic films are screened in the Ross Town Hall. Tea and coffee and treats from the Lolly bar are available before the film which also gives you an opportunity to meet the people who call Ross home!